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‘Hey Wingman’ Releases This Week, It’s Like a Cross Between ‘Lifeline’ and ‘The Hangover’

‘Hey Wingman’ Releases This Week, It’s Like a Cross Between ‘Lifeline’ and ‘The Hangover’

A few weeks back we wrote a story about the upcoming Hey Wingman looking for beta testers in our forums, and now the game is ready to offer its silly take on the Lifeline formula this Thursday. For those who didn’t read the original story, Hey Wingman uses the Lifeline formula of using a “messaging” app to communicate with the in-game characters, but it removes the real-time part and, instead, adds the kinds of storylines you would find in a movie like The Hangover. In Hey Wingman, you’re using a chat app to try and break up your best friend’s doomed wedding. You’ll be communicating with your buddy Romeo, who’s apparently not the sharpest knife in the drawer, as you both try to stop your friend Dan from marrying Jill.

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As you can see in the trailer, you’ll have to dig your friend out of all kinds of messes (most of them probably of your own creation). The game is a premium app, and it’s probably going to be silly fun. Check out our forum thread for more on the game, and get ready to ruin a wedding this Thursday.

‘Flipping Legend’ Review – It’s Flipping Sweet

‘Flipping Legend’ Review – It’s Flipping Sweet

It can be tough to stand out for a game that is in a well-worn genre. The sort of endless runner with action elements genre can be a tough sell for some folks when there’s a ton of those games out there. But Flipping Legend [Free] doesn’t deserve to be skipped. This separates itself from the rest of the pack by having a unique movement system, an RPG-style upgrade system, strong artistic direction, and most importantly: being fun to play at its very core.

Flipping Legend has you playing as one of several character types who have the ability to flip diagonally across the world, much like a bishop on a chess board. So, you can’t hit anything right in front of you, necessarily. You have to be constantly thinking in diagonals, trying to string together jumps, because your health constantly decreases when you’re not bopping enemies. You have five worlds to make it through, though a portal can be taken to later worlds when you reach each one five times. You also can backflip, but this uses up part of your super meter. Your enemies won’t just stand there waiting for you to bop them: some of them throw projectiles, will poison you, or are ghosts that will chase you down unless you get away quickly enough. Good luck with all that! It’s all a fun concept on paper, but it’s such a fun game to just physically play.

A big reason why Flipping Legend works so well is because the flipping feels so good to play with. It’s a fast, responsive control scheme, and flipping from tile to tile, bopping enemies in a row, it is very satisfactory to play with. The big thing you have to understand is how to use the flips across the screen, where flipping right on the right column will flip you to the left column. The checkerboard system helps out a lot, as it gives you a quick glance at if you need to get on a different checkerboard path. The whole system also conveys a feeling of correctness when you get a big string of enemies taken down, like this is how you’re supposed to be doing it. When a game feels so good to just play in its rawest form, that’s a sign that the bigger experience can be fun. This isn’t always the case, but Flipping Legend has a fantastic core to work with.

The special attack meter feels cribbed from fighting games for a different purpose here, but it provides a a useful system. See, you can use one bar of your meter to jump backwards, which is helpful for taking out enemies as there’s better rewards for keeping a string of kills going without missing an enemy. But, the meter takes longer to fill going down the line, so one jump backwards when you have a full meter comes at a higher cost. You can stand there and wait if you don’t have the meter full to jump backward, but with the constantly-draining health, this is only recommended ever so often. The super moves are rather useful, as they can take out multiple enemies, or help you out when you need a bit of an edge going through the world. The werewolf is a particularly interesting character because he has a forward jump for his special move; you don’t get the screen-clearing you do from other characters’ abilities, but you do get a useful little tool that can be upgraded to be more of a boon to your high score chasing.

The upgrade system is a bit different from other free-to-play games, because you have to level up your characters in order to upgrade them. Diablo‘s skill trees are a stated influence for Flipping Legend, where you get one skill point to spend on upgrades per character level. Experience is earned through scoring points, with bonuses to be found in treasure chests. Upgrades include things like being able to pick up multiple shields, being immune to certain negative effects, and faster power bar generation. But each character has some unique ability upgrades, where like the ninja can shoot shurikens at forward enemies when doing their backflip. The warlock’s spell can become more useful, and even help out with the ghosts in the cemetery. The character leveling also means that you have an incentive to play with each character, and have some solid progress to work toward in the game toward not just getting high scores and unlocking new areas, but also making your characters even better.

Flipping Legend is free-to-play, with two in-app purchase types. One is the ad removal IAP, which not only removes any kind of interstitial ad you might see, but you also don’t have to watch ads to get the free chest every 10 minutes, and chests you pick up in the game open for free at the end of your session. You can then buy legend chests: 10 for $ 0.99, 25 for $ 1.99, or 40 for $ 2.99. These give you rare skins, experience bonuses, and big quantities of gold for your runs. There’s no exorbitant spending here, and that ad removal IAP will take you a long way toward saving time with the chest unlocks. Interestingly, there is no way to continue a run, so once you die…you die.

The art style of Flipping Legend works rather well because of the way that it combines voxel art and low-resolution pixel art in a way that feels unique. Plenty of games have had either style, but the voxel characters of Flipping Legend feel special in that way. While the low-resolution fonts still feel a little jarring compared to the 3D art, I don’t know if there was a good solution for that. It’s still a good style for the game. The music has a great feeling to it, and there’s a cool aspect to where it changes smoothly with level transitions, to where you might not even notice that the track has been building into something different. There’s iCloud support so you don’t lose your progress when playing on different devices.

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Flipping Legend is just an astounding take on a well-trodden genre, of the free-to-play action-y runner. The work that Hiding Spot Games put into this along with Noodlecake’s help has been spectacular. The reports from GDC were that this was coming together really nicely, and after playing a ton of this one before and after release, Flipping Legend is a must-download in my book.

We’re Getting a ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Game – I Hope It’s Good

We’re Getting a ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Game – I Hope It’s Good

I love the original Blade Runner movie for many, many reasons, so I’m really looking forward to the upcoming Blade Runner 2049, the sequel to the classic Harrison Ford movie coming to a movie theater near you October 6th, 2017. And it looks like Blade Runner is coming to your devices, too. Today, Alcon Entertainment and Next Games announced that they are working on a Blade Runner 2049 mobile game. Although we don’t have much more information about the game, we do know that the game hopes to be a “highly engaging mobile game enjoyed by millions of fans globally.”

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Now, that statement doesn’t sound too comforting to me, but I hope I’m wrong. The Blade Runner universe offers great opportunities for storytelling, something Alcon Entertainment’s co-founders also point out, so I’m hoping we get a game worthy of the IP. Here’s hoping.

The Best Nintendo Switch External Battery Is the Anker PowerCore+ 26800 PD (And it’s Back in Stock on Amazon)

The Best Nintendo Switch External Battery Is the Anker PowerCore+ 26800 PD (And it’s Back in Stock on Amazon)

One thing that I think took most Switch owners by surprise is just how quickly it burns through battery, particularly when you’re used to gaming on an iPad which (depending on what you’re playing) can last all (or most) of the day. Comparatively, the Nintendo Switch when playing Zelda lasts right around three hours on battery, which makes mobile marathon play sessions difficult. I’ve got a bunch of different USB batteries, but even the “high power” ones designed for charging iPads couldn’t deliver enough power to the Switch to actively charge it while you’re playing it. At best, they’ll slow the rate that the Switch’s internal battery discharges as the system itself uses more power than the external battery can provide. This was the case across the board, until USB PD batteries began hitting the market. External batteries like the Anker PowerCore+ 26800 PD are capable of delivering the full 18 watts the Switch needs, actually allowing you to charge and play at the same time.

This 26,800 mAh battery backs over six times the capacity of the internal Switch battery, and I’ve yet to be able to hit the bottom of this battery in a single day before I can get back home and charge up both my Switch and the battery again… And I’ve had some marathon mobile play sessions. Last weekend it even had enough charge in it to take turns charging my Switch and a friend’s switch as we played Mario Kart 8 all day. Also, being USB-C, if you’ve got a new-ish MacBook, this battery can even charge your laptop.

The main downside is it’s pretty heavy. At 1.3lbs (compared to the Switch’s .88lbs with the JoyCons attached) it’s definitely a brick. But, high-capacity batteries with this energy density are always pretty heavy so it’s not like this is a new thing. USB PD batteries capable of delivering such high power output are pretty new to the battery market, so it wouldn’t surprise me if Anker eventually releases a whole line-up of these batteries with lower prices and capacities. A 5,000 to 10,000 mAh battery that doubles (or triples) how long you could play the Switch would be pretty perfect.

Anyway, as we’ve mentioned a bunch of times before, we’re huge fans of Anker accessories in general. They consistently hit the perfect point of being way cheaper than most other accessory manufacturers (particularly when compared to first party stuff) while still being very high quality. I’ve got a bunch of their batteries and have been happy with all of them. The Anker PowerCore+ 26800 PD for the Nintendo Switch (and USB-C laptops) is big, and heavy, but it’s great being able to throw it in your backpack and realistically never need to worry about the charge of your Switch, iPhone, or really anything else that can charge off USB or USB-C.

This Wake-Up Light Is One of Kinja Deals’ Top-Selling Products Ever, and It’s Never Been Cheaper

This Wake-Up Light Is One of Kinja Deals’ Top-Selling Products Ever, and It’s Never Been Cheaper

If you still haven?t upgraded your morning routine up a life-changing wake-up light, Philips? entry level model just got a huge price drop.

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It’s Your Lucky Day Because Amazon’s Having a One-Day Lucky Brand SaleĀ 

It’s Your Lucky Day Because Amazon’s Having a One-Day Lucky Brand Sale 

Amazon?s Gold Box is filled with all the Lucky Brand denim, tees, henleys and dresses you could need. Everything is marked down up to 50% off, so you can score jeans for a steal. No four leaf clover required. But like every Gold Box deal, this one only lasts for today.

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‘Miles & Kilo’ Review – It’s Dog-Gone Great!

‘Miles & Kilo’ Review – It’s Dog-Gone Great!

The original Kid Tripp [$ 0.99] was an excellent ode to Westone’s classic Wonder Boy and the Adventure Island series that it spawned. The game looked and sounded like a latter day Master System or Game Gear game, and the auto-running platforming was almost pitch-perfect. To this day, I consider it one of the better platformers available on iOS. Well, the kid is back, and this time, he brought his dog. More importantly, however, Miles & Kilo [$ 2.99] tries to advance the Wonder Boy-style gameplay with new moves, gimmicks, and obstacles that Tom-Tom never had to worry about. The result is a fantastic game with one foot planted firmly in the past and the other in the here and now. If you like platformers, you won’t want to miss this one.

Miles is like every other young boy. He’s curious, likes to play with his dog, and enjoys flying his personal airplane through dangerous storms. You wouldn’t think anything bad could come from that. Sadly, while navigating one such storm, his plane is brought down on a remote island. Don’t worry, Miles and his pup Kilo are fine, but the plane is in pieces. Although Miles, like any responsible kid, knows how to re-assemble an airplane, some hooligans abscond with the parts before he can get to work. Well, there’s nothing else to be done except to chase those jerks down and get the plane parts back. Miles and Kilo exit stage right after the baddies, and we’re on our way.

The game takes place over 5 different worlds with a total of 36 stages. Those stages rarely take more than a half-minute or so if you run them perfectly, but therein lay the trick. They’re packed full of dangers and obstacles, and while it’s certainly possible to clear them on your first try, you would have to have pretty snappy reflexes and a sharp eye. On top of that, simply clearing them is just the start of the battle. There are coins and fruit strewn about each level, and a timer keeps track of how long it takes you to get through the level. Another helpful counter keeps track of how many deaths you suffer. All of these things are taken into account to determine your grade on each stage. Naturally, you’ll want to get an S rank on every stage.

In the original game, the kid could run, jump, and throw fruit. Even without taking Kilo into account, Miles has a much wider array of actions at his disposal. He can slide, wall-jump, surf, punch, and more. Good dog Kilo is no passive pup either. He can run, jump, and lunge to bite baddies in a move reminiscent of the godless latter-day Sonic’s homing attack. How does all of this work without complicating the controls? Well, it’s all about the context. To start with, Kilo is only available in certain stages and sections. As for Miles, if he’s near something punchable like a crumbly wall, tapping the right side of the screen will unleash the beast. If he’s near something slide-able, like a low hanging wall with a gap under it, tap that same side to zip under it. See something you can climb? Just jump towards it and he’ll hang on automatically, allowing you to kick off with a jump by tapping the left side of the screen. Well, you get the idea. If there’s nothing context-sensitive around, a tap on the left will jump and a tap on the right will toss a fruit.

Unlike in Kid Tripp, you don’t have to worry about lives here. The game will keep its grim counter of how many times you screw up, but you’ll always be set back at the beginning of the level again like nothing happened. But you’ll have your memories, and you’ll need those to make sure you don’t make the same mistake too many times. Since there are no lives to worry about, coins don’t do anything this time except contribute to your score and rank. But they are nice and shiny, so you should probably collect them anyway. In Kid Tripp, you could toss an endless supply of rocks at enemies. You’re a bit more limited in this game. Miles can carry up to five pieces of fruit at a time, and if you waste them, you’ll have to collect more. The fruit stocks in most levels are fairly generous, but it’s something else to keep you hopping, potentially sticking your neck out into trouble.

The visuals have gotten quite an overhaul, too. Everything is presented in a higher resolution with more detail and animation than could be found in Kid Tripp. The audio isn’t all that different in terms of quality, which is fine given the era that Miles & Kilo is paying homage to. Chip tunes and sound effects that wouldn’t be out of place during SEGA’s golden years seem like the right choice even as the graphics are reaching a little farther. I also need to mention an interesting feature that I think is undocumented. If you play with an MFi controller, the game goes from being an auto-runner to a regular platformer. It’s easier to get through stages this way, but harder to get a good score, so it’s your call. The game is obviously designed around the auto-running concept, but it’s cool that the developer threw that option in there for those with controllers.

The play’s the thing, though, and that’s where Miles & Kilo shines the brightest. The controls are spot on and never get confusing in spite of the relatively large number of actions. The level designs are magnificent, with the new array of abilities allowing the developer to do things that couldn’t be done in the last game. Once you get into the groove, making your way through a level is like following a visual beat. Hitting all the notes, so to speak, feels fantastic, and that’s entirely down to the careful placement of hazards and enemies. I’d also like to commend the developer for putting a slightly gentler difficulty curve in this game. It gets tough, but it’s not nearly as prone to random difficulty spikes as Kid Tripp was.

Miles & Kilo is everything you could want from a follow-up to Kid Tripp. I love the sensible improvements it makes to the Wonder Boy formula, and the level designs are spot on. The new moves and additional character help keep things fresh, and the amount of content feels just about right. The game’s rather adorable retro-style presentation is also a winner, lending it the image of a console “big brother” title to the original’s handheld game. Those who love a good platformer will want to add this one to their collections immediately.